Vocabulary Development: Hotel & Catering

Room service allows guests to order food or drinks and have them delivered to their rooms. Bars in hotels are places where guests can enjoy drinks. A brochure is a small piece of paper providing information about local attractions. A continental breakfast is a light morning meal served in a common area, such as a […]

Room service allows guests to order food or drinks and have them delivered to their rooms. Bars in hotels are places where guests can enjoy drinks. A brochure is a small piece of paper providing information about local attractions. A continental breakfast is a light morning meal served in a common area, such as a dining room. Buffets offer a variety of foods, allowing guests to serve themselves. Spas, for relaxation, may offer services like massages or saunas. The reception, also known as the front desk, greets guests and assigns rooms. Banquet or meeting rooms are large spaces used for events like conferences or weddings. Making a reservation involves booking a hotel room, while checking in is the process of securing a room. Cuisine refers to a distinctive style of preparing food, often associated with a specific place, like French cuisine. Turndown service involves housekeepers remaking beds after use.

 

The summary discusses prepositional phrases, which start with a preposition and end with a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase. Examples include “in trouble,” “trust in me,” and “at the farm.” Prepositional phrases can also include wh clauses (e.g., “surprised at what she told his friend”) and ing clauses (e.g., “needs a truck for transporting gravel”). Prepositional phrases serve as modifiers (adjective or adverb) or complements of a verb or adjective. Examples include “The man with the hat” (modifying the noun “man”) and “The police caught the thief in the garden” (modifying the verb “caught”). Complements of a verb example is “We believe in what you said,” and a complement of an adjective example is “We are sure of his chances.”

 

Expanding your vocabulary in the context of hotel and catering can greatly enhance your ability to communicate effectively in the industry. Here are some key terms and phrases to consider:

1. Hospitality Terminology:

1.  Concierge: A hotel staff member who assists guests with various tasks such as booking reservations, arranging transportation, and providing information about local attractions.
2. Front Desk: The area in a hotel where guests check in, check out, and address any inquiries or issues during their stay.
3. Housekeeping: The department responsible for cleaning and maintaining guest rooms and public areas in hotels.
4. Room Service: The service provided by hotels where guests can order food and beverages to be delivered to their room.
5. Turndown Service: The evening service in hotels where housekeeping staff prepare the guest room for sleep by turning down the bed linens, providing fresh towels, and sometimes leaving chocolates or other amenities.
6. Valet Parking: A service offered by hotels where guests can have their vehicles parked and retrieved by staff.
7. Bellhop/Porter: A hotel employee responsible for assisting guests with their luggage and other belongings.

2. Catering Vocabulary

1. Buffet: A self-service meal where guests serve themselves from a variety of dishes arranged on a table or buffet line.
2. Banquet: A formal meal or social gathering often held to celebrate a special occasion.
3. Canapé: A small, decorative appetizer typically served at receptions or cocktail parties.
4. À la carte: A menu where each dish is priced separately rather than as part of a set meal.
5. Prix fixe: A menu offering a fixed price for a complete meal with a set number of courses.
6. Hors d’oeuvre: Small, bite-sized appetizers served before the main meal.
7. Sommelier: A trained wine expert responsible for selecting and serving wines in a restaurant.
8. Catering Manager: The person responsible for overseeing catering operations, including menu planning, staffing, and client relations.
9. RSVP: An abbreviation for the French phrase “Répondez s’il vous plaît,” meaning “Please respond.” It indicates that guests should reply to an invitation to confirm whether they will attend an event.

3. Food and Beverage Terms:

1. Culinarian: A professional cook or chef.
2. Mise en place: A French term referring to the preparation and organization of ingredients before cooking.
3. Degustation: A tasting menu featuring a series of small portions of food or drink.
4. Sauté: A cooking technique where food is quickly fried in a small amount of oil or fat over high heat.
5. Sous-vide: A method of cooking food slowly in a vacuum-sealed bag in a water bath at a precisely controlled temperature.
6. Mixology: The art and science of mixing cocktails, often involving creative and innovative approaches to drink preparation.
7. Pairing: The matching of food and beverages to enhance the flavors of both.
8. Bartender: A person who prepares and serves alcoholic beverages at a bar.

Expanding your vocabulary in these areas can help you communicate effectively with colleagues, clients, and guests in the hotel and catering industry.

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