The Nigerian Civil War | Causes, Positive Consequences & Negative Consequences

The Nigerian Civil War commenced on July 6, 1967, and officially concluded on January 15, 1970, with Major-General Philip Effiong, the chief of staff of the Republic of Biafra, formally renouncing the existence of the state at Dodan Barracks in Lagos.   Causes Of The Civil War Immediate Causes The war had both immediate and […]

The Nigerian Civil War commenced on July 6, 1967, and officially concluded on January 15, 1970, with Major-General Philip Effiong, the chief of staff of the Republic of Biafra, formally renouncing the existence of the state at Dodan Barracks in Lagos.

 

Causes Of The Civil War

Immediate Causes

The war had both immediate and remote causes:

  1. The massacre of the Ibos in the Northern Nigerian army by politicians of the first republic.
  2. Personality clash between Ojukwu and Gowon, both believing violence was the only means to reach an agreement.
  3. The secession bid, declaring the Eastern Region as the Republic of Biafra on May 30, 1967.
  4. The failure of General Gowon to implement the agreement reached with Ojukwu at Aburi, Ghana.

 

Remote Causes

  1. Rigging of the Western election in 1965.
  2. Fear of one tribe dominating others after the January 15, 1966, military coup.
  3. Abolition of the federal system of government by General J.T.U. Aguiyi Ironsi.
  4. Refusal of General Ironsi to bring January 15, 1966, coup plotters to justice.
  5. Over-ambition of some military officers to seize power.
  6. Eastern Region’s intention to control the oil discovered in its part of the country.
  7. Unilateral division of the country into twelve states by Gowon’s government.

 

Positive Consequences Of The Civil War

  1. Maintenance of Nigeria’s territorial integrity and unity.
  2. Reduction in the likelihood of secession by ethnic groups or states.
  3. Increased central government power.
  4. Expansion of federal government authority to create more states.
  5. Technological advancement in Nigeria.
  6. Enhanced confidence in the O.A.U., with only four countries recognizing the state of Biafra.

 

Negative Consequences Of The Civil War

  1. Loss of lives and properties, leading to a reduction in Nigeria’s population.
  2. Reduction in the population of Nigerian soldiers due to casualties.
  3. Financial and material costs incurred during the war.
  4. Untold hardship on the people of Nigeria.
  5. Disruption of education in many parts of the federation.
  6. Standstill in economic activities.
  7. Division of the country into twelve states.
  8. Disrespect brought to Nigeria.
  9. Jeopardized peace and tranquility in the country.

Related Posts:

Major Political Crisis In Nigeria

Political Parties In The Second Republic

The Development Of Political Parties In Nigeria | NNDP, UMBC, NYM, NCNC

Nigerian Federalism | Meaning, Factors, Structure, Features & Problems

The Second Republican Constitution Of 1979

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top