Storage of Roots And Tubers | Storage Methods & Home Storage

Storage Methods For Roots And Tubers BARN STORAGE: Utilized for yam storage, this method involves constructing a small hut near the compound house or on the farm. Inside the hut, yams are arranged on shelves and shielded from sunlight by covering the structure with banana and plantain leaves. Barn storage allows for adequate ventilation, making […]

Storage Methods For Roots And Tubers

BARN STORAGE: Utilized for yam storage, this method involves constructing a small hut near the compound house or on the farm. Inside the hut, yams are arranged on shelves and shielded from sunlight by covering the structure with banana and plantain leaves. Barn storage allows for adequate ventilation, making it easy to observe and remove sprouts before they cause significant damage.

 

PIT STORAGE: Another method for yam storage is through underground pits. Large open trenches are dug on the farm, lined with plantain or banana leaves, and yams are arranged inside. The storage is then covered with leaves and a layer of soil, providing protection against very cold weather. While cost-effective, this method has limitations, including susceptibility to spoilage by soil microflora, pests, rodents, sprouting, and heat accumulation, leading to physiological and structural degradation of the yam flesh tissue.

 

ON-FOOT STORAGE: Cassava storage on foot is uncommon due to its short storage life of 24 to 36 hours, attributed to high moisture content and enzyme activities. This method involves leaving cassava on the plant in the farm until needed, leading to land wastage and significant physiological and microbiological deterioration, resulting in losses.

 

MODERN TUBER STORAGE METHODS: Contemporary approaches to storing tubers include the use of anti-sprouting chemicals like maleic hydrazide, tertreachlointrobenzene, and naphthalene acetic acid. Ionizing radiation is also employed to prevent germination.

Storage Of Legumes, Fruits, And Vegetables

LEGUMES: Similar to cereals, legumes are stored in jute bags after drying them to low moisture content. These bags are placed in dry, airy storage spaces and can be sprayed with insecticides and fungicides. Rat-proof storage is essential.

 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: Storage options include controlled atmosphere storage, temperature reduction, and dehydration (drying).

 

Home Storage Of Foodstuff

CEREALS: Stored in airtight containers with added dry peppers acting as fumigants to prevent weevil attacks.

LEGUMES: Stored similarly to cereals, either in airtight containers or jute bags on raised platforms to deter rat damage.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: Home storage options involve syruping or salting. Fruits or vegetables are washed, blanched, and preserved in sugar or salt solutions. Oranges, for example, can be stored in baskets, the lowest compartment of the refrigerator, or on trays in an open, airy space.

FISH, POULTRY, AND MEAT: Storage methods include freezing, drying, smoking, and refrigerating. Freezing involves washing, trimming, and packaging in polythene bags. Drying is applied to fish and meat, with salt added before sun-drying. Smoking imparts flavor and involves salting before exposing to heat. Refrigerating is achieved by hanging fish or meat in wire cages over a fire, where the generated heat aids in drying without spoilage.

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