Storage of Foods

Food storage involves preserving food for a period before its eventual consumption. There are two primary aspects to consider in food storage: Post-harvest storage: This involves storing crops immediately after harvesting from the farm. Storage of prepared or home-cooked food.   The choice of storage method is influenced by several factors: The nature of the […]

Food storage involves preserving food for a period before its eventual consumption. There are two primary aspects to consider in food storage:

  1. Post-harvest storage: This involves storing crops immediately after harvesting from the farm.
  2. Storage of prepared or home-cooked food.

 

The choice of storage method is influenced by several factors:

  1. The nature of the foodstuff.
  2. The available facilities in the house.
  3. The required duration of storage.
  4. The intended use of the foodstuff.

 

One example of a post-harvest storage method is the “Rhombus” in Nigeria. Rhombus is a large, flask-shaped or cylindrical container with a capacity of up to 2000 kilograms of grains, depending on its size. The construction materials, such as woven grass, mud, or a mixture of these, as well as the size and shape of the rhombus, depend on local culture and traditions.

 

Another common method, practiced in many African countries at a traditional level, is the “Granary” or “Mud Slide.” This method involves incorporating storage into the walls of a compound house using materials like clay mixed with grass, juice, or local fruit and tree bark. Granaries are raised on platforms to prevent water contact during rains. While advantageous for storing large quantities of grains and maintaining a uniform storage temperature, construction can be time-consuming, ventilation may be challenging, and proper drying of grains is essential before storage. A smaller version of the granary is the crib or barn, typically used for unshelled maize.

 

Cribs are constructed with sticks, raffia palm, bamboos, or similar materials found on the farm. They are simple, easy to construct, and allow for quick transfer of commodities from the field. Cribs provide good ventilation, enabling storage of grains with higher moisture content, but they are susceptible to termite damage.

 

“Huts” are placed on platforms built over a hearth, utilizing heat from the fireplace to reduce moisture content in grains. Smoke generated creates unfavorable conditions for insects and pests. This method is commonly used for maize yet to be dehulled.

 

“Jute Bags” can be used to store threshed and shelled grains inside or outside the compound house. The storage environment must be kept clean to prevent attacks from pests and rodents. Jute bags are convenient for identification and require extra effort for rat-proofing and fumigation.

 

An alternative is suspending grain packages on trees, promoting air circulation for proper aeration. The modern method involves storing cereals in specially constructed silos.

Related Posts:

Methods of Preservation of Foods

Preservation Of Foods

Convenience Foods

Special Nutritional Needs | Young Children, Adolescents, Adults & Elders

Flours From Local Food Stuffs In Cookery

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top