Sea Food Cookery | Fish cuts, Methods of Cooking, Nutritive Values

Fish and seafood are aquatic organisms found in both fresh and saltwater environments. They are broadly categorized into two main groups: Fin fish Shellfish Fin fish, characterized by the presence of fins on their bodies, are further divided into two major subgroups: White or lean fish: These fish store their fat in the liver rather […]

Fish and seafood are aquatic organisms found in both fresh and saltwater environments. They are broadly categorized into two main groups:

  1. Fin fish
  2. Shellfish

Fin fish, characterized by the presence of fins on their bodies, are further divided into two major subgroups:

White or lean fish: These fish store their fat in the liver rather than between muscle fibers, resulting in white-colored flesh. Examples include cod, halibut, tilapia, and bream. The oil extracted from the liver of some large fish, like cod, is utilized for medicinal purposes, such as cod liver oil.

Oily or fat fish: This subgroup has fat distributed throughout their bodies, particularly in the muscle fibers, giving their flesh a dark appearance. Examples include herrings, mackerel, and salmon.

Shellfish, characterized by a protective shell covering their flesh, can be classified into two groups:

  1. Soft-bodied shellfish with a shell: Examples include oysters, mollusks, clams, and scallops.
  2. Crustaceans with a segmented crust-like shell: Examples include lobsters, shrimps, crabs, and crayfish.

Whitefish, due to its higher water content and lower fat, is nutritionally less valuable compared to oily fish. Shellfish, on the other hand, is valued for its protein content, along with beneficial B vitamins and iodine. Finfish are predominantly caught in freshwater, while shellfish are typically harvested from oceans and saltwater environments.

 

Nutritive values of fish:

Fish, like meat, is a rich source of protein containing all essential amino acids. Fish protein is more tender and digestible than meat. While fish generally has lower fat content than most meats, its mineral content varies. Calcium content is low in many fish types, but those canned with bones can be an excellent source of calcium if consumed with the bones. Oysters are particularly rich in iron. Fish from the sea are good sources of iodine, present in seawater. Fish also provide B-complex vitamins, with fatty fish being rich in fat-soluble vitamins A and D. Fish lacks carbohydrates and should be combined with carbohydrate-rich foods.

 

Fish cuts:

Different cuts include whole or round fish, drawn fish with removed internal organs, dressed fish with scales, head, tail, and fins removed, steaks sliced cross-sectionally from a large dressed fish, and fillets, which are practically boneless sides cut lengthwise from the backbone.

 

Methods of cooking food:

Various cooking methods for fish include frying, boiling, stewing, steaming, and grilling.

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