Rules of Concord

Concord refers to the alignment between the subject and the verb in a sentence.   Guidelines When the subject is in the third person and singular, the present verb takes ‘s’ or ‘-es,’ as seen in the example: Monica listens attentively.   For first person, second person, and third person plural subjects, the base form […]

Concord refers to the alignment between the subject and the verb in a sentence.

 

Guidelines

  1. When the subject is in the third person and singular, the present verb takes ‘s’ or ‘-es,’ as seen in the example: Monica listens attentively.

 

  1. For first person, second person, and third person plural subjects, the base form of the verb (plural verb) is used, exemplified by:
    1. We go to church every Sunday.
    2. You brush your teeth every morning.
    3. They/the children make a lot of noise in school.

 

  1. In a noun phrase, the verb must agree with the head word, the main word. For instance:
  2. One of my students has traveled abroad.
  3. Every one of the pupils was rewarded.

 

  1. Two or more singular nouns connected by ‘and,’ expressing the same person, idea, or thing, should take a singular verb. For example:
  2. Rice and beans are my favorite food.
  3. The long and short of the matter is that we must work.
  4. My friend and teacher have made my dream come true.

 

  1. Two or more nouns connected by ‘and’ but referring to different things must be accompanied by a plural verb. For instance:

My friend and my brother have arrived.

 

  1. A group of words beginning with ‘each,’ ‘every,’ ‘either,’ or ‘neither’ should have a singular verb, as in:
  2. Every man and woman has his own destiny.
  3. Each student was asked to pay some fee.
  4. Neither Tolu nor Teni pays attention to instructions.
  5. Either Tiler or Tony has done the needful.

 

  1. If one of the two nouns connected by ‘nor,’ ‘or’ is plural or differs in person, the verb agrees with the closest noun to the verb in the sentence, illustrated by:
  2. Either Temi or her sisters are interested in novels.
  3. Neither the Principal nor the teachers have come to school.
  4. Either my brother or I am traveling next week.
  5. Neither you nor Victoria has paid the required due.

 

  1. Indefinite pronouns and singular nouns ending with ‘s’ should take singular verbs, as in:
  2. Everybody is here.
  3. Everything is all right.
  4. Everyone has spoken.
  5. Nothing has happened.
  6. Politics is a dirty game in Nigeria.
  7. The news is broadcast at 6pm.

Related Posts:

The Use of the Dictionary

Prepositional Phrase

Article Writing

Prefixes

Active and Passive Voices

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