Punctuation Marks; Comma, Semicolon, Question Mark and Colon

Punctuation marks are symbols incorporated into a written piece to delineate words or groups of words, contributing to the effective presentation of ideas. Comma ( , ) The comma is employed for various purposes: To delineate words in a list. Example: She provided us with two pencils, four rulers, and pens.   To set apart […]

Punctuation marks are symbols incorporated into a written piece to delineate words or groups of words, contributing to the effective presentation of ideas.

Comma ( , )

The comma is employed for various purposes:

  1. To delineate words in a list.

Example: She provided us with two pencils, four rulers, and pens.

 

  1. To set apart phrases or clauses.

Example: Upon seeing her son, she felt relieved.

 

  1. To separate non-defining relative clauses.

Example: Mr. Kargbo, who is a lawyer, is aware of our situation.

 

  1. To distinguish main clauses linked by conjunctions like and, or, but, as, for.

Example: They have been complaining about their flight for five years, but unfortunately, the management has not paid any attention.

 

  1. In direct speech, to segregate the speech (in quotes) from non-speech.

Example: She said, “Run as fast as you can.”

 

Semi – Colon ( ; )

A semicolon is used for:

 

  1. Separating two main clauses, especially those not linked by a conjunction.

Example: She looks awful; she needs a shower.

 

  1. In place of a comma to separate parts of a sentence that already contains a comma.

Example: He made up his mind to take the bull by the horns; he would purge the country, no matter the cost.

 

Question Mark ( ? )

A question mark is utilized to:

 

  1. Mark the end of a direct question.

Example: Have you had lunch?

 

  1. Express doubt.

Example: He was in Toronto?

 

  1. At the end of a question tag.

Example: Bisi left late, didn’t she?

 

Colon ( : )

A colon is employed:

 

  1. To introduce a list.

Example: These are the items they are asking for: a bicycle, two goats, and four gallons of palm oil.

 

  1. To introduce a phrase or clause that provides additional information about the main clause.

Example: He could not leave her despite her misbehavior: he lacked the courage.

 

In the realm of vocabulary development, words associated with the press include:

 

Tabloid – A newspaper with small pages, usually half the size of those in larger papers.

Verbatim – A report written word for word, exactly as spoken or written.

Journalism – The work of collecting and writing news stories for newspapers, magazines, and radio.

Press man – A journalist.

Column – One of the vertical sections into which the printed page of a book, newspaper, etc., is divided.

Opinion poll – The process of questioning people who are representative of a large group to gather information about general opinion.

Newsreel – A short film of news that was shown in the past in cinemas/movie theaters.

Commentator – An expert on a particular subject who talks or writes about it on television, reporting on a specific area of news.

Press conference – A meeting at which somebody talks to a group of journalists to answer their questions or make an official statement.

Editorial – Connected with the task of preparing something, such as a newspaper or a book.

Headline – The title of a newspaper or article printed in large letters, especially at the top.

Byline – A line at the beginning or end of a piece of writing in a newspaper or magazine that gives the writer’s name.

Typesetter – A person, machine, or company that prepares a book, etc., for printing.

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