Prefixes

A prefix serves as a set of letters or syllables that is affixed to the front of a root word, thereby transforming it into a new word with an altered meaning. It acts as a linguistic element contributing to the modification or clarification of the base word. Examples of prefixes and their corresponding meanings, along […]

A prefix serves as a set of letters or syllables that is affixed to the front of a root word, thereby transforming it into a new word with an altered meaning. It acts as a linguistic element contributing to the modification or clarification of the base word.

Examples of prefixes and their corresponding meanings, along with derived words, include:

 

  1. un- (not): for example, unhappy, untrue
  2. dis- (not): for example, discomfort, dislike
  3. non- (not): for example, nonsense, non-smoker
  4. mis- (wrong): for example, mismanage, mislead
  5. mal- (bad): for example, malfunction, maltreat
  6. super- (exceeding): for example, supernatural, superman
  7. out- (exceed): for example, outdo, outlive
  8. sub- (below): for example, substandard, subhuman
  9. hyper- (beyond): for example, hypertension, hyperactive
  10. anti- (against): for example, anti-social, antiviral

 

These examples illustrate how the addition of specific prefixes imparts nuanced meanings to the root words, allowing for a diverse and expansive vocabulary in the English language.

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