Phrasal Verb

Phrasal verbs are formed by combining a verb with other particles such as adverbs and prepositions.   Here are some examples of phrasal verbs along with their meanings: Phrasal verbs are linguistic constructs formed by combining a verb with adverbs or prepositions, and they often convey nuanced meanings. Here are some examples:   Account for: […]

Phrasal verbs are formed by combining a verb with other particles such as adverbs and prepositions.

 

Here are some examples of phrasal verbs along with their meanings:

Phrasal verbs are linguistic constructs formed by combining a verb with adverbs or prepositions, and they often convey nuanced meanings. Here are some examples:

 

Account for: To provide a satisfactory reason or explanation.

Example: You must account for your excessive spending this month.

 

Back out: To withdraw from a commitment or refuse to proceed.

Example: He initially agreed to help, but he backed out at the last minute.

 

Carry out: To perform, obey, or fulfill a task or order.

Example: It is crucial to carry out the instructions precisely to ensure success.

 

Catch up with: To overtake or reach the same level as someone or something.

Example: The student worked hard to catch up with the rest of the class after falling behind.

 

Clean up: To tidy or remove a mess or clutter.

Example: Please clean up the kitchen after cooking.

 

Die down: To become gradually calmer and eventually disappear, as in the case of riots or fires.

Example: The protests gradually died down as the authorities addressed the issues.

 

Deal with: To tackle or handle a person, situation, or problem.

Example: She knew how to deal with difficult customers effectively.

 

Get back: To recover or reach one’s home.

Example: After a long journey, it’s good to finally get back home.

 

Hand over: To surrender or transfer authority, control, or possession.

Example: The outgoing president will hand over power to the newly elected leader.

 

Give away: To give something as a gift or for free.

Example: They decided to give away their old furniture to charity.

 

Hold up: To stop or delay something.

Example: The traffic accident held up the flow of vehicles for hours.

 

Jump up: To accept an opportunity or invitation eagerly.

Example: When offered the promotion, she jumped up at the chance.

 

Pull off: To succeed or accomplish a challenging task.

Example: Against all odds, they managed to pull off the ambitious project.

 

Move in: To relocate or change one’s residence from one flat or place to another.

Example: They decided to move in together after getting married.

 

Take after: To resemble or inherit traits from someone, usually a family member.

Example: The child takes after his father in terms of artistic talent.

 

These phrasal verbs add depth and specificity to the English language, allowing for more nuanced and precise expression.

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