Mode of Nutrition

Autotrophic Nutrition involves organisms that can independently produce their food. These self-sustaining organisms, known as autotrophs, achieve nutrition through processes like photosynthesis in green plants and chemosynthesis in certain bacteria.   Heterotrophic Nutrition, on the other hand, refers to organisms that are unable to manufacture their own food and rely on other organisms, particularly plants, […]

Autotrophic Nutrition involves organisms that can independently produce their food. These self-sustaining organisms, known as autotrophs, achieve nutrition through processes like photosynthesis in green plants and chemosynthesis in certain bacteria.

 

Heterotrophic Nutrition, on the other hand, refers to organisms that are unable to manufacture their own food and rely on other organisms, particularly plants, for their nutritional needs. Heterotrophs include fungi, protozoa, and some bacteria.

 

Various Forms of Heterotrophic Nutrition:

  1. Holozoic Nutrition: This type involves the ingestion of solid, complex food substances, followed by digestion, absorption, assimilation, and egestion. Simple animals, from protozoans like Amoeba to complex organisms like humans, follow these processes.
  2. Parasitic Nutrition or Parasitism: This is an association where smaller organisms (parasites) depend on larger partners (hosts) for food, causing harm and diseases to the host. Examples include the association between roundworms and humans, as well as plant parasites like cassytha and cuscuta.
  3. Symbiotic Nutrition or Mutualistic Nutrition: In this type of nutrition, two organisms of different species live together for mutual benefit. Examples include lichens, where algae and fungus form a partnership, and hermit crabs that carry other organisms on their shells for protection and transport.
  4. Saprophytic Nutrition: Organisms with this form of feeding derive their food from the remains of dead and decaying organic matter. Bacteria, fungi, and some animals exhibit saprophytic nutrition through extracellular digestion, releasing enzymes onto the substrate.

Commensalism: This is an association where one partner benefits, and the other neither gains nor suffers harm. An example is the relationship between sharks and remora fish.

 

Carnivorous Plants: These autotrophic and photosynthetic plants supplement their protein needs by feeding on insects or small animals. Examples include Venus flytrap, sundew plant, pitcher plant, and bladderwort.

 

Filter Feeding: This feeding mechanism is employed by certain aquatic animals to feed on tiny microorganisms in the water, such as phytoplankton and zooplankton. Animals like mosquito larvae, mussels, ducks, prawns, and lobsters use sieve-like structures to collect organisms from water currents.

 

Fluid Feeding: Some animals adopt this method, which involves feeding on fluid materials like nectar or blood. Examples include mosquitoes, aphids feeding on plant sap, and larger animals like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds sucking nectar from flowers.

Related Posts:

Animal Nutrition | Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats and Oils, Mineral Salts, Vitamins, Water and Roughages.

Nutrient Cycling In Nature | Carbon Cycle, Water Cycle & Their Importance

Plant Nutrition

Organization of Life

Characteristics Of Living Things

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