Egg Cookery | Egg Structure, Nutritive Value, Fresh Eggs & Uses of Eggs

Egg Structure: Eggs, originating from domesticated birds like chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, and guinea fowls, typically weigh around 56 grams. They are encased in a protective hard shell, which can be either white or brown, the color being dependent on the breed of the chicken. The shape of eggs is spherical, with one end pointed […]

Egg Structure:

Eggs, originating from domesticated birds like chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, and guinea fowls, typically weigh around 56 grams. They are encased in a protective hard shell, which can be either white or brown, the color being dependent on the breed of the chicken. The shape of eggs is spherical, with one end pointed and the other end blunt. Beneath the shell, two inner membranes create an air space at the blunt end. The egg’s center contains the yolk, anchored by cord-like structures known as Chalazae. Surrounding the yolk is the Vitaline membrane, followed by the thick egg white, the abundance of which indicates the egg’s quality.

 

Nutritive Value of Eggs:

  1. Protein: Eggs offer a biologically valuable and easily digestible source of protein, making them a suitable substitute for meat, fish, and poultry.
  2. Vitamins: Eggs contain Vitamins A, D, and B-Complex, with both the yolk and white being rich in riboflavin, imparting a slightly greenish tint to the egg white.
  3. Mineral Salts: Mineral salts such as iron, sulfur, phosphorus, and calcium are abundant in eggs.
  4. Water: The yolk comprises 51 percent water, while the white contains 87 percent, indicating a reasonable water content in eggs.
  5. Fat: The yolk contains a considerable amount of fat, distinguishing it from the fat-free egg white. Eggs lack carbohydrates or starch and should be combined with carbohydrate foods for bulk.

 

Selecting Fresh Eggs:

  1. A fresh egg, when held against a light source, should appear bright, not opaque.
  2. The yolk, when broken, should remain intact within the egg white; a mixed or diffused yolk is undesirable.
  3. An egg placed in salt water should sink and not float.
  4. No offensive odour should be detected when an egg is broken.
  5. When shaken, a good-quality egg should produce no sound.

 

Uses of Eggs in Cookery:

Eggs serve various purposes in cooking:

  1. Enhancing food value and flavour in dishes like doughnuts and pancakes.
  2. Acting as a binding medium in preparations such as fish cakes and yam balls.
  3. Coating foods for frying, like fish and yam balls.
  4. Serving as thickening agents in sauces and custards.
  5. Acting as a raising agent in cake making.
  6. Garnishing salads with sliced or wedged hard-boiled eggs.
  7. Glazing pastry, bread dough, biscuits, etc., before baking.
  8. Valuable in diets, especially for growing children and invalids, due to their rich and easily digestible nourishment.

Related Posts:

Poultry Cookery

Meat Cookery | Nutritive Value, Types, Methods of Cooking, Different Cuts

Condiments And Seasoning | Herbs, Spices, Food Flavoring & Coloring

Sea Food Cookery

Milk Cookery

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top