Constitutional Development In Nigeria

The Nigeria Council Of 1914 Established in 1914 following the amalgamation by Lord Lugard, the Nigeria Council comprised 24 official and 12 unofficial members, including both European and Nigerian Traditional Rulers. Functioning as an advisory body devoid of legislative powers, it served as a platform for expressing public opinion.   In 1922, Sir Hugs Clifford […]

The Nigeria Council Of 1914

Established in 1914 following the amalgamation by Lord Lugard, the Nigeria Council comprised 24 official and 12 unofficial members, including both European and Nigerian Traditional Rulers. Functioning as an advisory body devoid of legislative powers, it served as a platform for expressing public opinion.

 

In 1922, Sir Hugs Clifford assumed the role of governor in Nigeria, succeeding Lord Lugard, and subsequently dismantled the Nigerian Council. In its place, a Legislative Council for Southern Nigeria was instituted, while the governance of the North was determined by proclamations issued by the Governor.

 

The National Congress Of British West Africa (Ncbwa)

Founded in 1920 by Joseph Casely Hayford of the Gold Coast (Ghana) and Dr. Akinwade Savage of Nigeria, the National Congress of British West Africa included members from the West African Colonies of Ghana, Gambia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. Advocating for increased African involvement in administration, the judiciary, and other critical areas of governance, the Congress opposed discrimination and championed the use of elective principles. Additionally, they called for advancements in education (university) and improvements in the medical sector.

 

Effects Of The Ncbwa

  1. Africans gained representation in the legislative council through elections.
  2. The introduction of elective principles occurred in Nigeria in 1922, Sierra Leone in 1924, and the Gold Coast in 1925.
  3. Higher educational institutions were established in Nigeria, the Gold Coast, and Sierra Leone, including institutions like Fourah Bay College, Yuba College, and Achimota College.
  4. The NCBWA contributed to the development of newspapers in British West Africa, such as the Daily News of 1925 in Nigeria and The Morning Star in the Gold Coast.
  5. The introduction of elective principles led to the emergence of political parties, exemplified by the NNDP in Nigeria and NCSL in Sierra Leone.

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