Computer Output Devices

Output Devices and Types A computer output device is responsible for releasing processed data from the computer to either the user or storage devices. These devices produce data in various forms, such as audio, visual, and hard copy. They are peripheral devices connected to a computer via cables or a wireless network.   Types of […]

Output Devices and Types

A computer output device is responsible for releasing processed data from the computer to either the user or storage devices. These devices produce data in various forms, such as audio, visual, and hard copy. They are peripheral devices connected to a computer via cables or a wireless network.

 

Types of Output Devices

  1. Printer
  2. Speaker
  3. Headphones
  4. Monitor

 

The Monitor

A monitor, also known as a screen, Visual Display Unit (VDU), Cathode Ray Tube (CRT), or console, is an output device that resembles a TV screen. It is used to view the results of ongoing operations in a computer system.

 

Data entered into the system becomes visible on the screen, referred to as softcopy. Monitors come in different sizes, such as 12”, 13”, 16”, and 21”, among others.

 

External Features of the Monitor

  1. Cathode Ray Tube (CRT): The tube housing the console.
  2. Power Button: A toggle button for turning the monitor on and off.
  3. Adjustment Control: Contains features like brightness, contrast, color, etc.
  4. Power Cable: Supplies electric power to the monitor.
  5. Signal Cable: Transfers electronic signals from the computer through VGA into the monitor.

 

Uses of the Monitor

  1. Allows the operator to visually check entered data.
  2. Facilitates data input by producing forms on the screen for filling.
  3. Provides messages to the operator.

 

Types of Monitors

There are two types of monitors:

  1. Monochrome Monitor: Displays only one color and is unsuitable for windows applications.
  2. Colour Monitor: Displays graphics and text with multiple colors.

 

   Types of Color Monitors:

  1. Color Graphics Adapter (CGA)
  2. Enhanced Graphics Adapter (EGA)
  3. Video Graphics Adapter (VGA)
  4. Super Video Graphics Adapter (SVGA)
  5. Enhanced Video Graphics Adapter (EVGA)

 

Cathode Ray Tube and Flat Panel Monitors

The most common type of monitor for offices and homes is the Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) due to its low cost and precision. Flat Panel Monitors, commonly used by laptops, notebooks, palmtops, and LCD screens, are less bulky.

 

Printer

Various types of computer printers exist, each serving specific purposes:

  1. Inkjet Printers: These printers utilize a controlled electric field to spray a special ink onto the surface, making them suitable for situations with a moderate volume of printouts.
  2. Dot Matrix Printers: Equipped with a print head featuring steel pins and using an ink ribbon, dot matrix printers create images on surfaces through a series of dots.
  3. LaserJet Printers: Employing xerography in conjunction with an electronically controlled laser beam, LaserJet printers produce characters on the photoconductive surface of a rotating drum.

 

Examples Of Printers

Additional printer types include:

  1. Thermal Printers: Non-impact and relatively slow, these printers form characters by burning them onto specially treated papers.
  2. Electrostatic Printers: Operating by electrically charging paper and passing it through a toner solution, electrostatic printers have ink particles adhere to the charged areas of the paper.
  3. Dot Matrix Printers: These printers utilize a dot matrix printing technique, creating characters as a matrix of dots.

Printers can also be classified based on whether the printer head strikes the paper. An impact printer strikes the paper, while a non-impact printer does not. Non-impact printers, such as LaserJet and Inkjet printers, tend to be faster due to reduced physical movement during the printing process.

In the realm of printing technologies, two broad categories emerge: non-impact printers and impact printers. Each category encompasses various printing technologies, each with its unique method of transferring ink or toner onto paper. Let’s delve into the distinctions between these two types.

 

Non-Impact Printers:

  1. LaserJet Printers: Utilizing laser technology, LaserJet printers employ a laser beam to draw the desired image on a photosensitive drum. Toner is then attracted to the charged areas, and the image is transferred onto paper through a fusing process.
  2. Thermal Printers: These printers use heat-sensitive paper and apply heat to specific areas to create an image. Common in receipt printers and label printers, thermal printing is efficient and produces clear results.
  3. Electrostatic Printers: Employing the principle of static electricity, electrostatic printers use a charged drum to attract toner particles. The toner is then transferred to the paper and fused to create the final print.

 

Impact Printers:

  1. Inkjet Printers: Inkjet printers propel tiny droplets of liquid ink onto paper, creating high-resolution images. These printers are popular for their versatility and ability to produce vibrant colour prints.
  2. Electrothermal Printers: Using heat to generate a vapour bubble that propels ink onto the paper, electrothermal printers are known for their precision and are commonly found in photo printers.
  3. Daisy Wheel Printers: Characterized by a rotating disk with characters on its spokes, daisy wheel printers strike the paper through an inked ribbon to produce text. While not as common today, they were widely used for word processing in the past.
  4. Dot Matrix Printers: Dot matrix printers create characters by striking a ribbon with a matrix of pins. Each pin produces a dot, and together they form characters. Although not as high-resolution as modern printers, dot matrix printers are robust and find applications in certain niche markets.

Understanding the distinctions between non-impact and impact printers is crucial for choosing the right technology based on specific printing needs and preferences. Each type offers a unique set of advantages and limitations, catering to a diverse range of printing requirements.

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