Clauses – Subordinate And Insubordinate

A clause is a group of words containing a subject and a finite verb, forming part of a sentence, as exemplified by “The referee blew his whistle, and the match stopped.” Clauses are categorized into two types: Independent and Dependent. Independent Clauses, also known as Insubordinate Clauses, express complete thoughts and can stand alone as […]

A clause is a group of words containing a subject and a finite verb, forming part of a sentence, as exemplified by “The referee blew his whistle, and the match stopped.” Clauses are categorized into two types: Independent and Dependent.

Independent Clauses, also known as Insubordinate Clauses, express complete thoughts and can stand alone as sentences. For instance, “My English teacher is a kind man” and “The maid cooked dinner.”

On the other hand, Dependent Clauses, or Subordinate Clauses, lack a complete thought and rely on an independent clause for meaning. Examples include “while the boy was sleeping” and “the goat which ate our yam.” Despite not expressing a complete thought, subordinate clauses have a subject and predicate.

 

There are three types of subordinate clauses: Noun, Adjectival, and Adverbial.

  1. Noun Clause: Functions as a noun, as seen in “What he said is bitter” (subject of the verb) or “The cook gave us what we should eat” (object of the verb gave).
  2. Adjectival Clause: Acts as an adjective, modifying a noun or pronoun, as in “The man who came here is a teacher” or “That is the goat that ate our yam.”
  3. Adverbial Clause: Functions as an adverb, for example, “Ada saw him when she came to his office” or “She can be found where the man lives.”

In speech practice, stress on words with five or six syllables ending in –“ion” or –“ity” is placed on the second and third syllables from the back, respectively.

 

Examples of words ending in:

“ion”

adminSTRAtion

consideRAtion

communiCAtion

personifiCAtion

intensifiCAtion

 

Example of words ending in:

“ity”

authenTIcity

conducTIvity

possiBIlity

impossibility

responsibility

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