Capitalist Democracy

Capitalist democracy functions as a government system wherein authority emanates from citizens to elected officials, and governance operates with the consent of the electorate. It is organized based on principles such as popular sovereignty, political equality, consultation with the public, and adherence to majority rule.   Key Characteristics of Capitalist Democracy: Periodic Elections: Elections should […]

Capitalist democracy functions as a government system wherein authority emanates from citizens to elected officials, and governance operates with the consent of the electorate. It is organized based on principles such as popular sovereignty, political equality, consultation with the public, and adherence to majority rule.

 

Key Characteristics of Capitalist Democracy:

  1. Periodic Elections: Elections should be regularly held, open, free, and fair, allowing all eligible candidates to participate.
  2. Popular Sovereignty: Decision-making power resides in the entire community rather than a specific individual or ruling class.
  3. Political Equity: All members of the community have an equal opportunity to participate in the political decision-making process.
  4. Popular Consultation: Government policies should align with the preferences of the public, reflecting popularly accepted choices rather than self-serving interests.
  5. Freedom of Association and Groups: A democratic setting necessitates the existence of multiple political parties, providing alternatives for voters during elections.
  6. Respect for the Rule of Law: Equality before the law is crucial, ensuring that all individuals, regardless of status, are subject to the same legal principles and constitution.

 

Factors Impeding Democracy in Less Developed States:

  1. High Level of Illiteracy: Widespread ignorance about civic roles and governmental functions hampers active participation in the democratic process.
  2. High Level of Poverty: Economic independence is vital for democracy, and poverty can lead to election rigging, vote buying, and the use of individuals as political tools.
  3. Military Dictatorship: Prolonged military rule often results in distorted democratic structures, including inequitable wealth distribution, a weakened press, judicial dependence, and corruption.
  4. Use of One-Party System: Effective democracy requires multiple political parties to offer choices to the electorate, and a one-party system undermines democratic principles.

 

Political Parties in Capitalist Democracy:

Political parties act as crucial instruments for effective governance. They are associations of individuals or groups united under a national manifesto, competing to win control of the state machinery.

 

Methods of Political Competition:

  1. Political Campaigns: Parties communicate their manifestos through various means, such as radio, television, and print media, engaging with the electorate and addressing concerns.
  2. Debates and Conferences: Parties organize events to present their ideologies, manifestos, and candidates, providing a platform for interaction with the public.
  3. Provision of Material Needs: Parties donate essential items to the people, especially during elections, aiming to attract more support.
  4. Assistance on Election Day: Parties contribute vehicles to transport voters to polling booths on election day.
  5. Party Agents: Political parties nominate agents to safeguard their interests, ensuring fair play during vote counting and result announcements.
  6. Integration of People and Groups: Parties support or create various groups, such as market women and students, to garner additional support and influence.

Related Posts:

Employment | Factors, Benefits & Alleviate Poverty

Constituted Authority

Law And Order

What is Cultism?

Features of The 1999 Constitution

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top