Basic Concepts In Government 2

Legitimacy The concept of legitimacy finds its roots in the Latin term ‘legitimus,’ signifying adherence to the law. In the realm of governance, it denotes the acknowledgement of a political system by the populace under established rules and regulations.   A government earns legitimacy when it attains office through universally recognized and accepted means, such […]

Legitimacy

The concept of legitimacy finds its roots in the Latin term ‘legitimus,’ signifying adherence to the law. In the realm of governance, it denotes the acknowledgement of a political system by the populace under established rules and regulations.

 

A government earns legitimacy when it attains office through universally recognized and accepted means, such as free and fair elections. Moreover, the backing of the people towards the ruling government plays a pivotal role, as the stability of a government relies heavily on popular support.

 

Several factors influence legitimacy:

Leadership: Effective leadership enhances the perception of a regime’s legitimacy.

 

Common National Symbols: Shared national symbols, such as anthems, pledges, flags, and passports, contribute to the fostering of legitimacy. The observance of national holidays and the recognition of common heroes also play a role.

 

Popular Participation: Legitimacy requires the involvement of various interest groups like political parties, pressure groups, and trade unions in government affairs.

 

Foreign Diplomacy: A government’s legitimacy is influenced by the foreign policies it adopts, affecting its standing among other nations.

 

Good Governance: When a government meets the expectations of its people by implementing sound policies, it reinforces its legitimacy.

 

Popular Support: In modern democracies, the party garnering the most support in an election forms the legitimate government.

 

Sovereignty

Sovereignty, defined as the supreme power within a state, allows full legal authority over internal affairs without external control. Introduced by French political philosopher Jean Bodin, sovereignty signifies the absolute power of a state to create and enforce laws within its borders.

 

Types of sovereignty include legal, political, internal, external, de-facto, and de-jure sovereignty. Sovereignty is characterized by indivisibility, permanence, absoluteness, absence of foreign control, comprehensiveness, and inalienability.

 

Democracy

Democracy, rooted in the Greek words “Demos” (people) and “Kratia” (rule), is a government system based on popular consent. Abraham Lincoln defines it as government by the people, for the people. Democracy can be direct or indirect, with the latter involving the election of representatives.

 

Features of democracy include periodic free and fair elections, recognition and protection of fundamental human rights, majority rule, equality before the law, existence of opposition parties, allowance for public opinions, independent judiciary, separation of powers, freedom of the press, and adherence to the rule of law.

 

Demerits of democracy include potential dangers in illiterate societies, slow decision-making processes, emphasis on quantity over quality in vote counting, and challenges such as thuggery, violence, bribery, and corruption during elections, as well as the high cost of running large political parties.

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Basic Concepts Of Government

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Meaning And Scope Of Government

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Basic Concepts Of Government 3

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