Absorption

Absorption is the process through which the end products of digestion traverse the lining of the digestive tract. This occurs primarily in the inner lining of the small intestine, known as villi. Simple sugars and amino acids enter the bloodstream directly, while fatty acids enter indirectly through the lymphatic system.   Digestive processes involve various […]

Absorption is the process through which the end products of digestion traverse the lining of the digestive tract. This occurs primarily in the inner lining of the small intestine, known as villi. Simple sugars and amino acids enter the bloodstream directly, while fatty acids enter indirectly through the lymphatic system.

 

Digestive processes involve various sites, each with specific functions and enzymes:

A. Mouth:

    1. Digestive Juice: Saliva
    2. Optimum pH: Alkaline
    3. Enzyme: Ptyalin
    4. Functions: Starch to maltose conversion

 

B. Stomach:

  1. Digestive Juice: Gastric juice (acidic due to hydrochloric acid)
  2. Enzymes: Pepsin, Renin
  3. Functions: Conversion of protein to peptides and peptones; curdling of milk proteins by converting soluble caseinogen to insoluble casein

 

C. Duodenum:

  1. Bile secreted by the gallbladder
  2. Pancreatic juice produced by the pancreas
  3. Optimum pH: Alkaline
  4. Enzymes: Bile salts, amylase, trypsin, lipase
  5. Functions: Emulsification of fats; starch to maltose conversion; protein to peptides/peptones conversion; fats to fatty acids and glycerol conversion

 

D. Small Intestine or Ileum:

  1. Intestinal Juice
  2. Optimum pH: Alkaline
  3. Enzymes: Maltase, Lactase, Sucrose, Peptidase, Lipase
  4. Functions: Various enzymatic actions on carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

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Mineral Elements | Macro Elements, Micro Elements & Water

Vitamins

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